LaneFX is not like blind spot mirrors. It's only a mobile electronics system that moves your power mirrors in lane changes and merges.

CONTENTS: Blind Spot Mirrors to Prevent Accidents.

LaneFX automatically moves your vehicle's existing power side mirrors when you turn on your blinker. Replace Car Gadgets with the award winning blind spot mirrors solution. Also includes reverse mirror tilt module for park assist and backup warning.

LaneFX Auto Safety Series: 10 Reasons to Ditch the Stick-on Fish-eye Convex Blind Spot Mirrors

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LaneFX is More Than Just a Car Gadget

blind spot use with TomTomMany of the latest car models include systems that alert you when a car is in your blind spot. Those of us with older autos have had rely on our own road skills -- until now. Drivaware has introduced LaneFX: When you activate your turn signal, the device moves the corresponding side-view mirror to expose your blind spot and any vehicles that may be hiding in it. Of course, if you remember your driver's training, a quick glance over your shoulder does essentially the same thing. The LaneFX is compatible with any car that has power mirrors and is available in a Basic Edition ($197), Highway Edition ($242) and Commuter Edition ($296).

ParkFX for Your SUV - Prevent a Tragedy

At least once a week a child in America is run over, typically in backup (reversing) accidents

Are you extra aware and alert when you're in the vicinity of a sport-utility vehicle, van or a pickup truck that's backing up? Are you especially watchful for children when you're behind the wheel of a tall-riding vehicle—be it a van, truck or SUV—and you're backing it up?

You should be. According to Consumer Reports, the blind spot behind a tall vehicle such as a Chevrolet Avalanche truck can extend as much as 51 feet in the case of a small-stature driver about 5 feet 1 inches tall. Even for an average-sized driver, 5 feet 8 inches tall, the blind spot can extend nearly 30 feet behind the Avalanche, according to the consumer advice publication.

"No one is telling people there's a bigger blind spot in these vehicles," said Janette Fennell, founder and president of the child safety advocacy group Kids and Cars.

Pointing out her statistics showing at least one child a week in the United States is killed in a "backover" incident, Fennell urges that some kind of "backover warning and prevention device" be made mandatory on all vehicles.

How To Avoid Car Gadgets & Choose the Right Park Assist Technology for Your Driving Safety

Aftermarket companies offer three types of backup systems: rear-view cameras, sensor systems, and mirror tilt-down. Use Types to decide which type best suits your needs. For all camera and sensor systems, we recommend professional installation.

No matter what type of system you choose, consider these things when deciding on a specific model:

Know how the device mounts on your vehicle.

Camera and sensor systems that are mounted on the vehicle’s bumper or bodywork may necessitate drilling. They may not be the best choice if you lease your vehicle. If you have a hitch, you can consider a model that mounts in the trailer-hitch receiver. But you would have to remove the system to use your hitch. Other camera and sensor models mount on the license-plate frame. But some states prohibit frames because they can obscure the plate.

Within types, features vary. This is especially true with the sensor models we tested. The ultrasonic systems were generally the most sensitive, but their performance was adversely affected by rain, snow, or other inclement weather.

The microwave-based sensor systems we tested were not affected by weather but are less sensitive as a group. They also don’t warn the driver unless the vehicle or object behind it is moving.

The display quality of the camera-based models is very good, although it doesn’t match that of the larger screens on some carmakers’ systems. Most of the system displays turn on when the vehicle shifts into reverse, but one, the Audiovox, must be turned off and on manually.

Back-over Accidents

Moms Put ParkFX to the Test

There are no government statistics, but some estimate the family car killed as many as 500 children across the country last year. And the accidents happened in their own driveways. While some may wonder what kind of parent could do that, Rachel Clemens said it could happen to just about anyone. Two years ago, her daughter Adrianna wandered out of her Garland home. That’s when Adrianna's father accidentally backed over the child with his SUV. "He didn't see her," Clemens said. "That was the last day I saw my daughter alive." So, how could you not see a child behind the family car? Three Dallas moms agreed to take a safety test with the understanding that they would not know exactly what the tests were about. While they were distracted filling out a questionnaire, Drivaware and Safe4Kids placed an orange cone about 8-feet behind their vehicles and the drivers were then asked to back up. All three plowed right over the cone. "Did I just run over something?" Adrienne Ludlow as said as she backed up. "Oh, I hit the cone," said Amy Gordon. "I figured it was a branch or something," said Merideth Manning. Drivaware and Safe4Kids measured the blind spot behind each of their vehicles. The Honda Pilot had a blind spot over 30 feet, an Infiniti G35 about 18 feet and a Chevy Tahoe more than 35 feet. The eye-opening experiment had all three women interested in the same thing, which was looking into safety equipment like ParkFX or a rear sensor that beeps faster the closer a driver gets to an object. Safety cameras mounted on the rear of car are also available. The cameras relay a picture of the blind spot to a screen on the dashboard. Both technologies are available on new cars with after-market installation costs less than $500. "I would absolutely buy it, but wouldn't think of it until you came over and showed me how dangerous this could possibly be," Gordon said. Attorney Windle Turley represents the Clemens family, which sued Nissan, the maker of the family's SUV. They claim the technology should have been standard equipment. The case is still pending. "Manufacturers take off this needed safety equipment so they can market their vehicle a little bit lower in price than their competitors; and that's really wrong,” Turley said.  The trade group representing automakers says, "the best defense against back-over accidents is to check around the vehicle before you back up." "That does not work and you're sending the wrong signal,” Clemens said.  Clemens, and several lawmakers in Washington, support legislation that would require automakers to put back-over safety equipment on all new cars. Experts say it would add up to $200 to the price. "To me, I think to anybody, any parent, the cost is nothing compared to a child's life," Clemens said. There are no official numbers, but one safety group estimates that in Texas more than 90 children have been killed in or around parked vehicles in the last 15 years.

Don't Forget About Your Backup Blind Spots

Available ParkFX is the best park assist system to show you the parking boundaries and dangers around you when you're backing up

Kids ‘N Cars, a consumer organization working to make it safer for children to be around cars, is calling attention to the problem of the blind spot--that area behind the vehicle that you can’t see from the driver’s seat. The organization notes that at least 58 children were backed over and killed last year alone.

How big can the backup blind spot be? We measured a sedan, minivan, SUV, and pickup to find out. We used a 28-inch-high traffic cone, measuring how far behind the vehicle it would have to be before an average (5 feet 8 inches) and short (5 feet 1 inch) driver could see it. Larger vehicles tend to have a significantly larger blind spot. (Studies show the length of each blind spot; lighter for an average-height driver, darker for a shorter driver.)

Later in 2006, tests will be published on backup sensors and rear-view video backup warning cameras that could help to reduce the blind-spot problem. It’s best to always look carefully behind the vehicle before you get in and again before you put the car in gear. Also, always back up slowly.

Compare Backup Sensors & Cameras to ParkFX

Get the Latest Information on the Most Reliable Backup Warning Technologies

Not all reversing aids are equal. The sensing technology and the indicating method are critical to your driving safety.

How a park assist system alerts you

One option is video, which at first seems like a great choice. But one major flaw with having a video camera affixed to the back of your car with a monitor on your dashboard is that it also forces you to look forward while backing up. That can disturb your perception, your reaction time, and feel very unnatural. They are also extremely expensive, and you'll pay thousands of dollars to have a video system attached to your car, whether from the dealer or an aftermarket supplier.

Compare that to other bargain basement devices which actually have LED displays (little red lights) on your dashboard. These are cumbersome -- almost useless -- for much the same reason as video: when you drive in reverse, you naturally look behind you, and you'll never see the little red lights. They are also hard to read in bright sunlight.

Some other bargain technologies use a tone which beeps more rapidly as you get closer to an obstacle. You can at least hear the relative distance just by listening to the beeps, but you have to practice a bit to really understand how far you are from danger.

That's why an audible voice sensor is best. It tells you in a spoken voice exactly how far away you are. Not only do you not have to awkwardly look forward at your dashboard, you'll know without guessing how much further you can safely back up.

How a reversing aid detects objects

If you've never seen or used a reversing aid, you might be surprised at how technically advanced they actually can be.

Reversing aids use a variety of technologies to sense an object behind the car. Some units use Doppler radar, and others use infrared sensors, but by far the most accurate method of detection is the one the U.S. Navy uses on its submarines: sonar.

Sonar can operate in any weather, including direct sunlight or rain. And it doesn't require that the car be moving in order to sense an obstruction.

NHTSA estimates that 1 out of 25 accidents on US highways is due to improper lane change or lane merge. Get in on the latest and coolest mobile electronics technology. Car gadgets are interesting, but who are you going to trust to show you the vehicles in your blind spot area? Lane FX is safe, reliable, affordable and universal: It works in any vehicle (sedan, truck or SUV) equipped with power mirrors for lane change and also for parking assist. LaneFX is also available with ParkFX Park Assist and Curb Exposure System. ParkFX tilts your side mirror(s) downward when you put the vehicle in reverse to show you the curb (during parallel parking) or the parking boundaries around you. Get ParkFX and avoid giving your rims costly "curb rash"!

Compare Backup Sensors & Cameras to ParkFX for the Most Reliable Backup Warning Technology

Not all reversing aids are equal. The sensing technology and the indicating method are critical to your driving safety.

How A Park Assist System Alerts You

One option is video, which at first seems like a great choice. But one major flaw with having a video camera affixed to the back of your car with a monitor on your dashboard is that it also forces you to look forward while backing up. That can disturb your perception, your reaction time, and feel very unnatural. They are also extremely expensive, and you'll pay thousands of dollars to have a video system attached to your car, whether from the dealer or an aftermarket supplier.

Compare that to other bargain basement devices which actually have LED displays (little red lights) on your dashboard. These are cumbersome -- almost useless -- for much the same reason as video: when you drive in reverse, you naturally look behind you, and you'll never see the little red lights. They are also hard to read in bright sunlight.

Some other bargain technologies use a tone which beeps more rapidly as you get closer to an obstacle. You can at least hear the relative distance just by listening to the beeps, but you have to practice a bit to really understand how far you are from danger.

That's why an audible voice sensor is best. It tells you in a spoken voice exactly how far away you are. Not only do you not have to awkwardly look forward at your dashboard, you'll know without guessing how much further you can safely back up.

How A Reversing Aid Detects Objects

If you've never seen or used a reversing aid, you might be surprised at how technically advanced they actually can be.

Reversing aids use a variety of technologies to sense an object behind the car. Some units use Doppler radar, and others use infrared sensors, but by far the most accurate method of detection is the one the U.S. Navy uses on its submarines: sonar.

Sonar can operate in any weather, including direct sunlight or rain. And it doesn't require that the car be moving in order to sense an obstruction.

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FEATURES & OPTIONS

Standard Features Interactive List
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Mirror Speed Boost
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Accessories & Add-On's Multi-Vehicle Kit
Accessories & Add-On's End-of-Lease Kit
Accessories & Add-On's Parts Bin

BLIND SPOT INFO

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FEATURED AUTO SAFETY ARTICLES & OTHER LINKS FOR SAFE LANE CHANGES

LaneFX is Safe for Leased Vehicles
LaneFX Voted #1 Driver Awareness Technology by BlindSpotSystems.com

HOW TO CHANGE LANES SAFELY WITH LANEFX

LaneFX Demo

Virtual LaneFX Tour
Top 10 Ways Drivers Use LaneFX
LaneFX Moments
Blind Spot Challenge / Driver Awareness Index Study
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COMPARE LATEST 12-VOLT CAR GADGETS

Competitive Comparisons
Why LaneFX is Right For You
Compare LaneFX
10 Reasons to Replace Your Stick-On Convex Auxilliary Mirrors with LaneFX
Independent Research Studies Stress the Importance of Safer Lane Changes

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How often do you check your
blind spot?
before every lane change
and & merge
only when traffic is heavy
I only check my mirrors
By the time you complete a head turn to check your blind spot, your vehicle travels more than half of a football field. Unattended! 1

As you activate your turn signal, or at the press of a button, LaneFX moves your side mirror outward to sweep and expose your blind spot. It pauses long enough for you to see what may be lurking there. Then, it reliably returns your mirror to its original position.

LaneFX’s Patents Pending technology is packed with safety features and it's guaranteed to work in any vehicle equipped with power mirrors. It's safe, reliable and responsive, even at highway speeds.
LaneFX as featured in Sept '07 issue of Car & Driver magazine
"The [LaneFX] adjusters hold more potential than, say, Volvo's blind spot system, which... can't actually show you what's lurking unseen."
the top car gadget in the world of auto safety and mobile electronics
LaneFX as featured in The Wall Street Journal
The latest car technology:
"Systems That Keep an Eye on Blind Spots"
" It's amazing to me that it's a universally adaptable product! "
HGTV's I Want That! Tech Toys
as seen on Home & Garden Television's
"I Want That! Tech Toys"
the top car gadget in the world of auto safet and mobile electronics
" It consistently found those folks who seem to want to ride next to you, just off your back bumper. "
PC Magazine ExtremeTech LaneFX Review
PC Magazine's Extreme Tech Column: "the coolest product I never reviewed!"
" LaneFX will scan the blind spot without making the driver whip his head around and without add-on cameras. "
" The system holds promise because it meets a strong desire by consumers and is less expensive and more reliable than high-tech radar systems. "
Mobile Electronics
MADE IN USA.U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL PATENTS PENDING.
Drivaware reminds you to always wear you seatbelt, exercise caution when merging or changing lanes, obey all traffic laws and always rely on your primary senses when making all driving decisions. 1 Claim based on an average driver performing a typical head turn blind spot check in a median time of 1,800 milliseconds (source: NHTSA) resulting in an elapsed distance of 171.6 feet at 65mph (or 184.8 feet at 70mph). Drivaware, the Drivaware mirror icon logo, LaneFX and the LaneFX shield logo and tag line are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Drivaware Inc. Copyright © 2005-07 Drivaware® Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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LaneFX is a blind spot exposure system, not a detector. This means that LaneFX is by design, inherently incapable of displaying false positives
LaneFX in the automotive accessories news

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